283. 2020 Orthodox Statistics in America: Bad News and Good News

If you hate statistics, you may want to stop reading now. Come back next week. However, a better choice: If you want to find out what’s going on, you can do so the easy way. I’ll begin each section with a headline. Read those, at least. And out of the goodness of my computer, I’ll […]

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282. Usury – the Forgotten Sin

“And now for something completely different.” Or maybe not – since Saint Francis didn’t lend money. He didn’t possess any. Usury: lending money at interest I was visiting family this week, so I took this an as easy topic:¬†I’d just find the Scriptural and Patristic references to Usury and copy them here. Wrong! I found […]

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281. The Saint who Almost Made it – Francis of Assisi

What was it Francis “almost made”? He “almost made it” onto the calendar of the Orthodox Church. Why didn’t he? 1 ¬†Because he missed the deadline! It was not Francis’ fault, of course, that he was born in 1182, but unfortunately the year 1054 is the cut-off, the officially accepted date for the split between […]

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280. My Own Stories about Some Great Men: Bishop Kallistos Ware, Metropolitan Philip, Father Thomas Hopko, Father Peter Gillquist

I often think how blessed I was to become Orthodox during the era of these four great men – and even more blessed to have met all of them. (I mean, I was pastor of only a little parish church in the Midwest.) One I knew only in passing, and I doubt he remembers me. […]

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279. It was mostly Saint Anselm’s fault.

What we’re talking about is Anselm’s misunderstanding of how Christ saves us – which, combined with a little mistranslation by Saint Jerome, led finally to Protestantism. But a lot happened in between, and we’re getting ‘way ahead of the story. Why this topic today? Because of this next Sunday’s Epistle reading (Galatians 2:16-20), which in […]

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